Sesame Allergies

A serious allergy which is becoming common

Sesame allergy is an increasingly common allergy. It can also be a severe allergy; it has been known to cause anaphylactic shock. In fact, according to some research the incidence of sesame allergy in some countries places it as one of the top 5 most common allergic substances.

With food allergies, it's important to read labels for any processed food that you eat. While sesame is not a common ingredient, you may find it in foods that you would not expect. Cross-contamination is another problem. Sometimes, a food may not contain sesame as an ingredient, but may have been produced in a facility that uses sesame in other products. If you have a severe allergy, you'll want to avoid these kinds of products as well.

Sesame allergy can be a difficult allergy to handle because the issue of exposure may not be limited to food alone. For those with serious allergy, other kinds of exposure can also trigger a reaction. Therefore, a potential problem for those with sesame allergies is that sesame is not only an ingredient in food. It can also be an ingredient in pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. Since pharmaceuticals and cosmetics are not subject to the same labeling laws as food, it can create a significant problem for the person who is trying to avoid an allergen.

Food allergies can pose some unique challenges to those who have them. One of these is cross-reactivity. Allergy sufferers can sometimes "cross react" to other foods or plants. In the case of sesame allergy, it is possible to react to poppy seeds, kiwi fruit, hazelnuts and rye grain. If your allergy is serious, you would be wise to avoid these foods.

As with all allergies, your best approach to managing your allergy is avoidance of the allergen itself. Repeated uncontrolled exposure can lead to a worsening of an allergy. A mild allergy could become a life-threatening one. In fact, controlled exposure should only occur under the care of a physician, as part of immunotherapy.

Immunotherapy is not appropriate for every person. If you are interested in it, you'll have to seek the advice of an allergist.

With food allergies, it's important to read labels for any processed food that you eat. Sometimes, a food may not contain sesame as an ingredient, but may have been produced in a facility that uses sesame in other products. This could mean there is a risk of cross-contamination. If you have a severe allergy, you'll want to avoid these kinds of products as well.

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